THMGT201-19B (HAM)

Visitor Experiences

15 Points

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Waikato Management School
Te Raupapa
School of Management and Marketing

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: f.mostafa@waikato.ac.nz
: helena.wang@waikato.ac.nz
: lori.jervis@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: nat.enright@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5 or 9 can also be direct dialled:
    • For extensions starting with 4: dial +64 7 838 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 5: dial +64 7 858 extension.
    • For extensions starting with 9: dial +64 7 837 extension.
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Paper Description

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Introduction

In many ways the visitor or tourist experience lies at the heart of tourism as a social phenomenon and as an industry. People travel in search of experiences that lie outside of their daily lives, and hence the creation of satisfactory experiences determines the success of a destination and its ability to reap the benefits of tourism. Increasingly people are becoming experienced travellers and are more demanding, even as they grow in numbers. Those demands relate to personal enjoyment and enhancement, and additionally, at least for some, assurances that their travels are also sustainable from the environmental and social perspectives as well as the economic. In addition, each component in the chain of events that create a holiday have their role to play in the overall assessments made of holidays. Thus, for example, the enjoyable time spent on holiday can be brought to naught by the delayed flight home, the loss of baggage and non-performance by the airline.Visitors experience their holidays in both a sequential and gestalt manner, which is why, as we will discover, visit experiences are complex and often difficult to manage.

Paper description

The purpose of this course is to provide both a holistic and particularistic understanding of the issues pertaining to visitor experiences by reference to conceptual and practical measures.

Students will understand

  1. The temporal and spatial nature of holidays as comprising a sequence of events, each of which is dependent upon the other in the creation of experience
  2. The nature and importance of motives for travel as not only creating demand but also establishing criteria by which experiences are evaluated
  3. The psychological nature of holiday experience by reference to theories of flow, self-fulfilment, self-actualisation and recreation and leisure

Paper structure

The paper will be taught through lectures of two hours per week and one hour of seminar work plus research project work. However, the distinction will be blurred as students will be asked at various times to complete in-class exercises as part of the time-tabled sessions.

Learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete the course should be able to

  1. Apply psychological theories of motivation to the design of holiday experiences
  2. Be able to devise modes of measurement that can evaluate tourism satisfaction
  3. Be able to assess the contribution of tangible components to the intangible nature of holiday experiences, both generally and with reference to specific forms of holidaying experiences
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Paper Structure

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The paper comprises lectures, workshop sessions and an assignment schedule of two essays and two more practical pieces of work - namely the development of a promotional video and then an analysis of textual material.
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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Learning outcome

    Students who successfully complete the course should be able to

    1. Apply psychological theories of motivation to the design of holiday experiences
    2. Be able to devise modes of measurement that can evaluate tourism satisfaction
    3. Be able to assess the contribution of tangible components to the intangible nature of holiday experiences, both generally and with reference to specific forms of holidaying experiences
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. Essay
19 Jul 2019
12:00 AM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
2. Essay
12 Aug 2019
5:00 PM
30
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
3. Video assessment
23 Sep 2019
5:00 PM
20
  • Email: Lecturer
4. Textual analysis - evaluating the holiday experience
21 Oct 2019
12:00 PM
20
  • Online: Submit through Moodle
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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There are no required readings, but suggested readings are inserted into the lecture schedules
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Recommended Readings

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Recommended readings are indicated with the lecture schedule
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Online Support

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Suggested readings are provided with the lectures and are accessible through such databanks as ScienceDirect. It is thought important that you have the skills to obtain such readings from these forms of datasets and library resources.
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Workload

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The workload requires 45 hours of class and workshop attendance and 105 hours of reading, video taking, writing and textual analysis.
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