WRITE201-18B (HAM)

Applied Writing: Food Writing

15 Points

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Division of Arts, Social Sciences and Law
School of Arts
English

Staff

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Convenor(s)

Lecturer(s)

Administrator(s)

: margaret.amies@waikato.ac.nz

Placement Coordinator(s)

Tutor(s)

Student Representative(s)

Lab Technician(s)

Librarian(s)

: anne.ferrier-watson@waikato.ac.nz

You can contact staff by:

  • Calling +64 7 838 4466 select option 1, then enter the extension.
  • Extensions starting with 4, 5 or 9 can also be direct dialled:
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Paper Description

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This paper begins with some ‘basics’ of food writing. First we read examples of the art of food description, and try our own: the aim here is to learn that economy and careful word choice are essential for all strong writing. We will then discuss what makes a good recipe, then write and peer-critique our own. We will read about taste (as both a physical sensation and as a set of class-based judgments about discernment), and about structure. This is fundamental knowledge for an assessment module involving a restaurant review. We will then read several food-based memoirs representing a range of gender, ethnic and class positions, and write our own. We will finally read some ‘researched’ food essays –a feminist critique of the diet industry; an essay in praise of conspicuous consumption; one writer’s account of his relationship with a sourdough bread starter. The final assessment component is a researched food essay. There is also a formal opportunity to revise and resubmit a piece of work for a final percentage of the mark for the paper.

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Paper Structure

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The paper will be taught as a series of intensive reading and writing workshops.

Students are expected to attend all classes. A roll will be taken, and a mark allocated for participation.

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Learning Outcomes

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Students who successfully complete the course should be able to:

  • Have an understanding of food in its cultural, social and personal contexts.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Have an awareness of the central role food and eating plays in the construction and representation of gender and class, and in social and political movements to do with ethnicity, migration and assimilation.
    Linked to the following assessments:
  • Have an familiarity with the major sub-genres in which food is represented, including the recipe, the restaurant review and the food memoir, and some practical experience in writing each of these.
    Linked to the following assessments:
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Assessment

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Assessment Components

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The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0. There is no final exam. The final exam makes up 0% of the overall mark.

The internal assessment/exam ratio (as stated in the University Calendar) is 100:0 or 0:0, whichever is more favourable for the student. The final exam makes up either 0% or 0% of the overall mark.

Component DescriptionDue Date TimePercentage of overall markSubmission MethodCompulsory
1. The art of description (approx 500 words)
24 Jul 2018
4:30 PM
10
  • Hand-in: Assignment Box (FASS)
2. Restaurant review (approx 750 words)
10 Aug 2018
4:30 PM
10
  • Hand-in: Assignment Box (FASS)
3. Memoir (approx 1500 words)
4 Sep 2018
4:30 PM
20
  • Hand-in: Assignment Box (FASS)
4. Researched food essay (approx 1500 words)
2 Oct 2018
4:30 PM
20
  • Hand-in: Assignment Box (FASS)
5. Resubmission (approx 1500 words)
26 Oct 2018
4:30 PM
20
  • Hand-in: Assignment Box (FASS)
6. In-class writing tasks (3 @ 5% each)
15
7. Participation
5
Assessment Total:     100    
Failing to complete a compulsory assessment component of a paper will result in an IC grade
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Required and Recommended Readings

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Required Readings

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Nigel Slater, Toast: The Story of a Boy’s Hunger (Harper Perennial 2004)

A course reader is available via Waikato Reading Lists. Hard copy will be available for purchase from Campus Copy.

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Recommended Readings

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M.F.K. Fisher, The Art of Eating (Wiley 2004)

A. A. Gill, Table Talk: Sweet and Sour, Salt and Bitter (Phoenix 2007)

Diane Jacob, Will Write for Food: The Complete Guide to Writing Cookbooks, Restaurant Reviews, Articles, Memoir, Fiction and More (Marlow and Company, 2005)

David Remnick (ed), Secret Ingredients: The New Yorker Book of Food and Drink (Random House 2007)

NB: Good writing requires good research tools. You should make sure you have access to a good hard-copy Thesaurus (eg Roget's Thesaurus) and a reputable hard-copy dictionary (eg The Concise Oxford Dictionary)

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Online Support

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There is an online Moodle community for this paper. Moodle can be accessed via iWaikato. Lecture presentations, tutorial exercises, assignment details, important dates and the paper outline are all available from this site.

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Workload

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The expected workload for this paper is 12 hours per week (3 hours of class time and 9 hours of self-directed study) throughout the 17 week semester.

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Linkages to Other Papers

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Prerequisite(s)

Corequisite(s)

Equivalent(s)

Restriction(s)

Restricted papers: ENGL211

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